Google Waterfalls, Rivers & Lakes - Nordic Landscapes : Photography by Nicolas Lietaer

Nordic Landscapes : Photograpy by Nicolas Lietaer

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Dettifoss waterfall, Iceland
Dettifoss waterfall, Iceland. The Dettifoss falls are 100 metres (330 ft) wide and have a drop of 45 metres (150 ft) down to the Jökulsįrgljśfur canyon. It is the most powerful waterfall in Europe with an average water flow of 193 m3/s.

Dark clouds gathering over lake Frostastašavatn, Iceland
Dark clouds gathering over lake Frostastašavatn, Iceland. This lake in the Icelandic highlands close to Landmannalaugar is popular for fishing. It abounds with arctic char and trout.

Pink sky reflected in the water, Norway
Pink sky reflected in the water, Norway. In the fall mist often forms over lakes due to the warmer water evaporating and condensing into the cold air above.

Breaking dawn at lake Gutulisjųen, Norway
Breaking dawn at lake Gutulisjųen, Norway. The small Gutulia national park was created to protect the primeval forest and a landscape of alpine woodland, bogs and small lakes. The forest is dominated by pine, some of which are 400 years old, as well as spruce and birch.

Waterfall near Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland
Waterfall near Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland. This waterfall originates from the melting waters of the Eyjafjallajökull ice cap which covers an active volcano. An eruption in 2010 threw volcanic ash high up in the atmosphere which led to the closure of the airspace over large parts of Europe.

River Lysakerelva in the winter, Norway
River Lysakerelva in the winter, Norway. The capital of Norway, Oslo, gets a fair amount of snow during winter. The greatest snow depth on record in Oslo is 302 cm, measured at Tryvasshųgda (514 m). Most often the first snow comes during november and it melts again in april.

Ljotipollur crater lake, Iceland
Ljotipollur crater lake, Iceland. In 1477 a single huge explosion formed the Ljotipollur ('dirty puddle') explosion crater near Landmannalaugar, when rising magma came into contact with groundwater. The crater lake is 14 m deep and has a healthy population of brown trout.

Snow landscape along Lysakerelva river, Norway
Snow landscape along Lysakerelva river, Norway. Snow can fall at extremely low temperatures, but because the air can hold more water vapor at warmer temperatures most heavy snowfalls occur when the air temperature is higher than -10°C.

Magnificent waterfall, Norway
Magnificent waterfall, Norway. Thanks to glacier and snow-fed rivers plunging down from high mountains and steep cliffs, Norway is blessed with countless beautiful waterfalls.

A beautiful waterfall, Norway
A beautiful waterfall, Norway. In the World Waterfall Database, 7 Norwegian waterfalls are listed among the 12 waterfalls with the tallest drop. Mongefossen waterfall in Mųre og Romsdal has a vertical drop of 773 meters.

Early morning in Hedmark, Norway
Early morning Hedmark, Norway. The forest district of Hedmark is where the Eurasian Taiga starts, a continuous belt of boreal forest stretching from Norway all the way to the Pacific. The county has also about 2.000 lakes and numerous rivers.

Selfoss waterfalls, Iceland
Selfoss waterfalls, Iceland. These fabulous waterfalls are found in north-eastern Iceland on the Jökulsį į Fjöllum river. In fact, just a few hundred meters downstream is Dettifoss, the most powerful waterfall in Europe.

Beautiful winter scenery in Oslo, Norway
Beautiful winter scenery in Oslo, Norway. The river Lysakerelva runs from lake Bogstadvannet to the Oslo fjord. It has many small waterfalls and when the waters swells during the melting of the snow in early spring, it is used for whitewate kayaking.

River at Eldgjį, Iceland
River at Eldgjį, Iceland. River bank erosion is the wearing away of river banks by the water flow. It is a natural process that causes rivers to meander and change course. However, in many cases people are trying to reduce or prevent bank erosion in order to stop the river from changing course.

Small water cascade, Norway
Small water cascade, Norway. This little stream in Rondane national park is fed by the snow and rain on the Rondane massif. However, compared to many other mountain areas in Norway, Rondane has a relatively stable and dry climate.

Sunrise in Femundsmarka national park, Norway
Sunrise in Femundsmarka national park, Norway. The landscape of Femundsmarka national park consists largely of marshes and lakes. The park lies along Norway's second largest natural lake, Femunden.

River Lysakerelva, Norway
River Lysakerelva, Norway. The river Lysakerelva is 7.4 km long and it forms the border between Oslo and the neighboring municipality of Bęrum. The name of the river comes from the Lysaker farm which is situated on the Bęrum side of the river.

Small stream, Norway
Small stream, Norway. About 99,1 per cent of Norways electrical energy is generated from hydroelectric power plants, making it Europe's largest consumer of hydroelectric power.

Gjerdingselva river in Oslo, Norway
Gjerdingselva river in Oslo, Norway. In the past, Gjerdingselva was used to transport timber. However, as part of the improvement of the capital's drinking water supply around 1900, most of the river was lead into a tunnel thereby reducing it to a small brook.

Canyons of Žórsmörk, Iceland
Canyons of Žórsmörk, Iceland. About 12.000 years ago, Žórsmörk was a fjord with spectacular glaciers reaching the water. When most of the ice melted, broad valleys, steep canyons and raging rivers were left. Still today, Žórsmörk is surrounded by three ice caps.

Waterfall Seljalandsfoss, Iceland
Waterfall Seljalandsfoss, Iceland. This famous waterfall drops 60 meters (200 ft) over the cliffs of what was the former southern coastline. Today the coastline is 9 km (5.5 miles) further south.

Bratterud waterfall, Norway
Bratterud waterfall, Norway. Micro hydro electric turbines are powered by this waterfall, thereby generating about 1,9 GWh electricity per year. This corresponds to the average yearly energy consumption of approximately 88 households.

Blįhylur crater lake, Iceland
Blįhylur crater lake, Iceland. This volcanic explosion crater near Landmannalaugar was formed in an explosive eruption about 1.130 years ago. The lake has a healthy population of small brown trout.

Winter along Akerselva river, Norway
Winter along Akerselva river, Norway. The 8 km long Akerselva river flows through Oslo, from lake Maridalsvannet down to the Oslo fjord. The river drops from approximately 149 meters down to sea level through a series of natural and manmade waterfalls.

Water cascades in Nordmarka, Norway
Water cascades in Nordmarka, Norway. This little stream is running down from lake Gjerdingen. With a depth of 60 meters, Gjerdingen is the deepest lake of Oslo marka, the protected nature area surrounding the city of Oslo.

Water cascade in the forest, Norway
Water cascade in the forest, Norway. Rain water contains carbonic acid which can slowly dissolve rocks, thereby causing erosion. Water that freezes in small cracks of rock will act as a jack thereby splitting the rocks into smaller pieces and accelerate the erosion.

Stepping stones, Norway
Stepping stones, Norway. Femundsmarka national park is mostly popular for fishing and canoeing.Anglers can catch many different kind of fish like trout, perch, char, grayling, burbot, whitefish and pike. Ice fishing for char is also very popular during winter.

Raging river, Norway
Raging river, Norway. Norway has more than 600 salmon rivers spread all over the country, which is more than any other country in the world.

Blįhylur crater lake, Iceland
Blįhylur crater lake, Iceland. Other names for this explosion crater are Hnausapollur and Tjörvafellspollur. In the old times it was called Litlavķti or Little Hell. The name was later on changed because Hell is a very popular name for crater lakes like this.

Silky smooth water, Norway
Silky smooth water, Norway. When photographing running water, reducing the shutter speed to about half a second or longer will make the water look very smooth, silky or like fog. This effect is widely used amongst photographers.

Breaking dawn at lake Gutulisjųen, Norway
Breaking dawn at lake Gutulisjųen, Norway. The small Gutulia national park was created to protect the primeval forest and a landscape of alpine woodland, bogs and small lakes. The forest is dominated by pine, some of which are 400 years old, as well as spruce and birch.

Waterfalls, Norway
Waterfalls, Norway. Throughout the world, people have an enduring fascination with waterfalls. For some, it’s the sound of the water tumbling over the rocks. For others, it’s the sheer beauty or tranquility.